Our Recruiting Process

Here at Professional Recruiter Associates, we follow a very simple process in order to do our Recruiting. We separate it into 6 different steps.

  1. The first portion is what we called the “Information” stage. This includes us gathering information from the client as to what exactly they are looking for. We do this by researching the company, finding out about their products, their services, who do they do business with, how they like to do business, and a variety of other details which may not seem relevant but they really are. From there we find out what their “need” is. Everyone Company can use a Sales person, but what do they really need? It is our job to find that information out. From there we find out the details for the position, such as compensation, qualifications, location, and the objectives of the position. Once we have gathered as much information as we can get without being a part of the company who we are working for, we move on to step 2.
  2. The second step is to “Research”. This is different than gathering the information, because the research that we do is based off the information that we have gathered in the previous step. This can be anything from doing research on competitors of the company for which we are Recruiting for, to finding resumes using our various resources which match the information we have gathered for the position that we are filling.
  3. The 3rd step in the process is “Contact”. This includes taking the Resumes that we have compiled for the position and contacting the candidates. The candidates need to know what they are interviewing for, and we need to know if they are still interested in a new opportunity, therefore communication has to be made in order to determine whether or not the situation is right. Once we have found candidates who are interested, we have to train those candidates to understand the position for which we are having them interview for. It looks bad on the Recruiting firm as well as the candidates that we send if we do not prepare them for whats ahead. This does take time, and certain candidates are eliminated from the interview process if they choose not to take this portion of the process seriously. After we have trained our candidates and narrowed it down, it is time for step 4.
  4. Step 4 is the interview process. This portion is simple, we contact the Hiring Manager, and we set up a time for the interview between this person and the candidate that we have chosen. This portion can be very easy, or can take some time based on the type of schedules that we are looking at between the Manager and the candidate. Once the interview times are setup, we move on to the following step.
  5. The 5th part of the process is the “Selection & Negotiation” stage. This includes taking the offer that the Hiring Manager is making for the candidate and presenting this to the candidate in a way that they make the best possible decision for themselves. Obviously we would like to be able to make the placement right off the bat, with the first offer, but in a lot of instances this is not the case, sometimes the candidate needs more, or wants more, and would rather fight for more instead of caving and taking the first offer that comes into play. Realistically we serve as the middle man, due to the fact that we are providing the Hiring Manager a candidate, and most of the time they feel that we must present the offer to the candidate, sometimes, if they are really interested, they will offer it themselves, but this is quite rare. Once we have reached an agreement between both parties, we move on the final step of our process.
  6. The 6th and final step is the “Transition”. This includes assisting the candidate in beginning their career with a new company, and checking with them to make sure that things are going alright. You don’t want your candidate to be released shortly after being hired, because this does not reflect well on your firm. To be a successful Recruiter, don’t think that your job is done after the candidate is hired, we recommend that you contact your candidate even years after you have gotten them a position. You never know, maybe they have moved up in the company, and they are now in a position to hire, and you can get yourself another client, or perhaps they are unhappy and would like for you to find them another job. Either way contacting your candidates after you have found them their job is key, only positive things will come from doing this

Well there you have it, the 6 step process to being a successful Recruiter. It may sound like a lot of work, but it is actually quite fun. This process can range from a week to 6 months depending on the hiring company, and the candidates. If you enjoy working with people, and being a problem solver, being a Recruiter will definitely be something that you would enjoy. It is tedious at times, but it is a very rewarding career, and makes any future career choices seem much easier. Thank you for reading, and we hope that we were able to assist any Recruiters, and give any Hiring Companies a good idea of how we do things, and as you can see we have established a very successful and in-depth process over the years which will not fail!

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4 comments

  1. akb /

    Well I truly liked studying it. This tip offered by you is very practical for correct planning.

    • Marjorie /

      Excellent post. Your remarks are spot on. I agree with all of them.I’d like to add one more point to the mix. Another consequence of individuals being unemployed for longer stretches of time is they’ve circulated their resume pretty much everywhere. Whether a company shows interest in you or not, they may still be retaining your information. There were some candidates who came my way who had already chased the places I would go with their profile. Companies can refuse to pay a third party recruiter’s fee for someone they already have in their pipeline. There were occasions when I was able to make a convincing case the company having that individual in the pipeline wasn’t enough as they clearly didn’t go to the lengths I did to realize the potential fit. The candidates resumes/applications were long forgotten. That argument was only successful with companies I had solid, long-standing relationships with. The other companies simply decided to cut me out of the equation and call the candidate through the information they had on file. If I’ve got a lot of potential candidates to work with, I’m going to pick the ones more inclined to make my efforts pay off. Candidates approaching a recruiter for help who have been looking for a while should come with a complete list of where they’ve submitted their resume already, whether the company showed interest or not. If the recruiter can see some room to cover ground the candidate missed, it may improve the chances of a recruiter making the attempt.

  2. I’ve learn several good stuff here. Certainly price bookmarking for revisiting.

  3. Jones /

    I wish to read even more things about it! Nice post. I was checking constantly this blog and I am impressed! Very helpful information :)

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